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Osteogenesis Imperfecta and School

Children with severe osteogenesis imperfecta frequently meet the qualifications for special education, a program of specially designed instruction (which is free to parents) that is designed to meet your child's unique needs. Since most of these children with osteogenesis imperfecta will work in the world of the non-disabled as adults, it is important to integrate them into a regular classroom setting, where they can associate with all types of children, as soon as possible.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta and School: An Overview

Children with severe osteogenesis imperfecta frequently meet the qualifications for special education. This program of specially designed instruction, which is free to parents, is designed to meet your child's unique needs and covers children from birth to 21 years of age. If your child qualifies, you can receive physical and occupational therapy for your child in your home. Contact your local public elementary school and ask to speak to the principal or person in charge of special education. Make arrangements to have your child evaluated.
 
The case for early integration into the regular classroom seems strong. As adults, most of these children with osteogenesis imperfecta will work in the world of the non-disabled, and as children, they need to associate with all types of children.
 
Most parents feel that because of the limited exposure that their child has during his or her preschool years, a part-time preschool or playgroup is very beneficial. Some preschools ask for volunteer aides to help with protection, toileting, and mobility during this time. It is ideal to have someone other than a parent perform this function. Parents should observe and evaluate available preschools in their area, selecting one where the physical structure and attitudes of the staff are in harmony with their child's needs.
 
When the time comes for regular school placement, try to mainstream your child as much as possible. Sometimes this involves considerable negotiation with your school district, but the efforts will be rewarded as you see your child blossom.
 
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